Month: November 2010

Facebook and Twitter, From Another Perspective

A few weeks ago, I wrote a series of posts comparing Twitter and Facebook.  One of the responses I got, was from Jen.  She said, “[Facebook and Twitter] are totally different things. And I love them both.” And while we both love both platforms, the way Jen uses Twitter is…

Lesson 3: The Internet’s Not Ready for the Experience Economy

This is part of a series of blog posts based on the book Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida. One of the things Dr. Florida points out is the creative class’ preference for buying experiences rather then products.  He argues, as many social theorists lead by B. Joseph…

Sauerkraut Sunday: Moving to the Cabbage

Sauerkraut is plentiful in the Burgh, found on any hot dog or with kielbasa at many restaurants.  As I am preparing to leave Charlotte, I thought I’d see about finding sauerkraut in the restaurants of my favorite non-Pittsburgh city.  As it turns out, there are not a lot of options. …

Lesson 2: Education is Now Self-Service

This is part of a series of blog posts based on the book Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida. The Creative Class theory that Richard Florida advocates is just one of many that deal with people in the new economy switching jobs regularly.  Another major theory is Free…

Lesson 1: The Irish and the Potential for Remigration

This is part of a series of blog posts based on the book Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida. The picture above is of Dixie’s in Charlotte during the Steelers vs. Oakland Raiders game.  Not a particularly important game and definitely not a primetime one, but the bar…

Book Review: Richard Florida’s Rise of the Creative Class

I highly recommend Richard Florida’s The Rise of the Creative Class for two key reasons. First, it is a work of sociology that just makes sense, or at least will to most of the readers of this blog.  Florida creates a compelling theory to explain a new class of people…

Sunday Sauerkraut: The Awful as Sin Edition

Today’s sauerkraut recipe is a tad bit unconventional.  Most of us think of Sauerkraut as food, some of us think of it as a disgusting food.  But few of us think of it as the pure embodiment of disgust, so disgusting that it can be used as a symbol of…

Monopolies

The Internet has long been held up as a model for what the free market is supposed to look like—competition in its purest form. So why does it look increasingly like a Monopoly board? Most of the major sectors today are controlled by one dominant company or an oligopoly. Google…

LinkedOut

LinkenIn’s CEO was at the Web 2.0 conference and gave an interesting antidote that’s sure to keep customers and investors in LinkedIn happy.  When asked whether he was afraid of Facebook, he claimed to be unafraid because of two little words, “keg” and “stand”.  He points out that as long…

The Internet’s NPR

I got a lot of funny looks ten years ago when I started talking to people about Wikipedia.Let’s just say some people were skeptical of the notion that volunteers from all across the world could come together to create a remarkable pool of human knowledge – all for the simple…